art

How Many Will I See?

I saw this article this morning, printed it out and started making my plans.
I think I will add a photo every time I see one.. I have seen the wind at the entrance to Central Park… today I may go see a dog holding a taxi… or is it a taxi holding a dog? I better find out.

https://ny.curbed.com/maps/best-public-art-installations-new-york-city

New York’s best public art installations this season
Get outside to check out some of the best art in New York City this spring and summer
Ameena WalkerApr 27, 2018, 11:41am EDT

1 Jacob Hashimoto: “The Eclipse” and “Never Comes Tomorrow”
Jacob Hashimoto’s first large-scale New York City installation will happen on Governors Island this summer, with two pieces: “The Eclipse” and “Never Comes Tomorrow.” The former will be installed in St. Cornelius Chapel, and features hundreds of kites made from rice paper (a version was installed at the 57th Venice Biennale); the latter will bring “wooden cubes and massive steel funnels” to the tunnel at Liggett Terrace. The exhibits will open on June 2.

Iwan Baan/Courtesy West8
Governors Island
New York, NY 11231
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2 Judith Modrak: “Our Memories”
In “Our Memories,” sculptor Judith Modrak has crafted seven interactive installations that recognize “the need to record one’s personal experience,” per its description. Visitors are asked to recall a “powerful memory” and then share it by depositing a color-coded stone into one of the sculptures. The colors correspond to six emotions: joy, anger, love, sadness, fear, and surprise. The sculptures will appear in lower Manhattan’s Thomas Paine Park for 10 months beginning in May, after a short stint in Central Park.

Judith Modrak.
Lafayette St & Worth St
New York, NY 10007
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3 Karla & James Murray: “Mom-and-Pops of the L.E.S.”
Lower East Side-based photographers and authors James and Karla Murray, who have chronicled New York’s changing landscape for years, will debut a nearly life size structure that showcases images of four mom-and-pop shops that once were. “Mom-and-Pops of the L.E.S” is set to debut this June at the Lower East Side’s Seward Park.

Via the Lo-Down.
Essex St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 639-9675
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4 Dale Chihuly: “Rose Crystal Tower”
Last year, famed glass sculptor Dale Chihuly brought his first major New York City exhibition to the New York Botanical Gardens. Though that exhibit is long gone, his 31-foot-tall “Rose Crystal Tower,” crafted from Polyvitro crystals and steel, remains in Union Square Park. The sculpture resembles a giant stick of pink rock candy so it’s definitely hard to miss.

NYC Parks/Daniel Avila.
Union Square
New York, NY 10003
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5 Dorothy Iannone: “I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door”
Located at 22nd Street along the High Line, a new large-scale art installation by artist Dorothy Iannone pays homage to the Statue of Liberty and the message it bears. The title of the colorful installation, “I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door,” is a line taken from Emma Lazarus’s poem that adorns the statue—a reminder that New York City and the country have always been a welcoming place for immigrants. The installation will remain in place until March 2019.

Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.
New York
NY 10011
(212) 500-6035
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6 Diana Al-Hadid: “Delirious Matter”
Syrian-born, Brooklyn-based artist Diana Al-Hadid will bring six sculptures to Madison Square Park this summer as part of her installation “Delirious Matter.” The pieces will interact with the natural landscape of the park, and are created using a process that Al-Hadid says is “a blend between fresco and tapestry.” The piece debuts on May 14 and will be open until September 3.

Madison Square Park Conservancy
11 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10010
(212) 520-7600
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7 Mel Chin: “Wake” and “Unmoored”
Beginning July 11, Times Square will showcase two project by Mel Chin that nod to “the city’s triumphs and the complicated layers of its past.” The two pieces, “Wake” and “Unmoored,” are part of a larger multi-location exhibition, “Mel Chin: All Over the Place,” which will bring the artist’s work to the Queens Museum and the Broadway-Lafayette subway station, in addition to Times Square. “Wake and “Unmoored” will remain in Times Square until September 5.

Times Square Arts.
1605 Broadway
New York, NY 10019
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8 Yinka Shonibare MBE: “Wind Sculpture (SG) I”
British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE brings “Wind Sculpture (SG) I”—a 23-foot-tall piece that’s been hand-painted in colors inspired by the beaches of Lagos—to one Central Park’s southeastern entrance at 60th Street and Fifth Avenue. The sculpture is meant to be “reminiscent of the untethered sail of a ship billowing in the breeze” and will stick around until October 2018.
central park wind
Jason Wyche/Public Art Fund.
Lenox Hill
New York, NY 10019
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9 Various Artists: “1978”
This exhibition, organized by the city’s Parks Department, will function as an ode to the the New York newspaper strike of 1978 that lasted from August to November 1978. The exhibit, simply called “1978,” will highlight 3,000 images from eight New York Times photographers that documented the historic event. Photos will be displayed at Central Park’s Arsenal building between May 3 and June 14.

NYC Parks.
830 5th Ave
New York, NY 10065
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10 Kathy Ruttenberg: “in dreams awake”
In her major first large-scale outdoor installation, artist Kathy Ruttenberg is bringing six sculptures to Manhattan’s Broadway malls between 71st and 72nd streets. “Kathy Ruttenberg on Broadway: in dreams awake” will portray characters from a fairytale-like dream and aims to brighten the day of passersby. Ruttenberg also thought it would be fun to merge “an urban escape into a rural wonderland,” while also returning “nature’s creatures to our human consciousness.” Catch the sculptures on display beginning April 27 through February 2019.

Fionn Reilly.
2095 Broadway
New York, NY 10023
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11 Huma Bhabha: “We Come in Peace”
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has tapped Pakistani-American sculptor Huma Bhabha to create a site-specific installation on the building’s rooftop garden. The artwork, called “We Come in Peace,” was inspired by the 1951 sci-fi movie, The Day the Earth Stood Still and features a two enormous figures that are “carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof,” says a press release. It’ll be in place through October 28.

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I was here… May 25, 2018.  See my post.

 

 

 

 

Huma Bhabha/The Met.
1000 5th Ave
New York, NY 10028
(212) 535-7710
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12 Lady K Fever: “Birds Eye View”
Artist Lady K Fever has transformed the walls outside of Mosholu Playground with three vibrant, playful murals that illustrate butterflies, ladybugs, flowers, and other wildlife. The feel-good mural is a nice addition to the community park.

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visited on May 28th 2018, part of our drive to the Cloisters.

 

 

 

 

 

NYC Parks.
Mosholu Pkwy S & Bainbridge Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(212) 639-9675
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13 MADSTEEZ: BTN x MADSTEEZ Basketball Court
Art has been infused into the basketball court beneath the Triborough Bridge, where California-based artist and designer MADSTEEZ has covered the court with vibrant mural that splits it into east and west divisions. It’ll be around until February 2019.

Via NYC Parks.
Hoyt Ave S
Astoria, NY 11102
(718) 393-7272
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14 Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers: “Hide & Seek”
This year’s winner of MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program is “Hide & Seek,” created by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of the Minneapolis-based firm Dream The Combine, who are working in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of ARUP. As in years past, there’s a strong participatory element to the project, though there’s no water-spraying “party wall” or wading pools this time around. Instead, “Hide & Seek” is “inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city”; there will be nine different elements, including seating (including a giant hammock!), cooling areas, and a runway that should prove pretty popular during the museum’s Warm Up dance parties.

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sometimes you dont know what you are seeing.  While at MoMA PS 1 last week we saw this project under construction.  Look at the rafters in the mid ground… thats going to be it.

 

Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine
22-25 Jackson Ave
Queens, NY 11101
(718) 784-2084
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15 Rose DeSiano: “Absent Monuments”
Artist Rose DeSiano, one of the winners of the UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant, will bring a series of reflective sculptures, called “Absent Monuments,” to Rufus King Park in Jamaica, Queens. The mirrored monuments are surrounded by floral tiles inspired by Native American pattern work. They pay homage to the neighborhood’s “history of colonization, war, abolitionism, immigration, and rural urbanization.” The exhibit will make its way to Queens this June.

NYC Parks.
150-29 Jamaica Ave
Jamaica, NY 11435
(718) 206-0545
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16 Tanda Francis: “Adorn Me”
Tackling racial issues head on, Brooklyn-based artist Tanda Francis is bringing “Adorn Me”—a sculpture that is meant to “address the underrepresentation of [the African presence] in public artworks—to Fort Greene Park. Francis was inspired by traditional African sculptural work, and hopes to bring a “healing message during a time of heated debate over monuments erected as symbols of oppression and control.”

NYC Parks.
Washington Park St
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(212) 639-9675
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17 Erwin Wurm: “Hot Dog Bus”
This June, the Public Art Fund will bring a quirky exhibition to Brooklyn Bridge Park—and it can also fill your belly. Designed by contemporary Austrian artist Erwin Wurm, the “Hot Dog Bus” is a vintage Volkswagen bus that’s been given a vibrant coating of yellow paint and will sling free hotdogs on summer weekends. Catch “Hot Dog Bus” at Pier 1 on Saturdays and Pier 5 on Sundays from noon to 6 p.m.

Public Art Fund.
334 Furman St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 222-9939
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18 Various Artists: “Sonic Gates”
“Sonic Gates” is a series of ten public art installations that create a “sound sculpture walk” from St. George to Stapleton, Staten Island. Many artists participated in the exhibit, and pieces range from a 17-foot-long wind harp that plays itself to a 90-foot-long mural that pays tribute to the borough’s maritime heritage. The installation will debut in June 2018.

Design Trust for Public Space/Staten Island Arts.
Bay St
Staten Island, NY
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